Jul 25 2019

5 Things to Know About the 2019 Census Test

2019-07-25T14:23:20-07:00Human Rights/Civic Participation Publications, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

Fact sheet The 2020 Census has been in the news mostly because of the citizenship question (which, hopefully, has finally been resolved). There's been much less news coverage over the routine pre-census test, which has already started. The Census Bureau is sending out test forms and some of those forms include the citizenship question. Confused? Here are five things you need to know about the census test.

Jan 20 2019

A new Child Tax Credit would put us on the road to a stronger New Mexico

2019-02-13T11:58:14-07:00Economic Security Publications, Education Publications, Health Publications, Local Data, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications, Tax and Budget Publications|

Fact sheet New Mexico’s tax system is upside down—most New Mexico families pay more than twice the rate in state and local taxes than the wealthiest pay. A new state-level Child Tax Credit would help hard-working families and make our tax system more fair. (State-level data on how this tax credit would benefit families)

Jan 15 2019

2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book

2019-01-22T10:44:26-07:00Economic Security Publications, Education Publications, Health Publications, Kids Count, Kids Count Publications, Local Data, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

Report After ten years of austerity, New Mexico has fallen to last in the nation in child well-being. The state also lost a lawsuit claiming that it is not meeting its constitutional obligation when it comes to public education. It's time to change course. This annual publication reports the latest data on child well-being in New Mexico to help us choose the path forward. (An annual KIDS COUNT report; state-, county-, tribal-, and school district-level data on indicators of child well-being; data by race and ethnicity where available)

Aug 29 2018

New Mexicans are Worth More: Raising the State’s Minimum Wage

2018-11-28T15:53:35-07:00Economic Security Publications, Health Publications, Local Data, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

Report New Mexico's minimum wage has not been raised in nearly a decade. Worth $7.50 an hour back in 2009, it now has the purchasing power of $6.30. Nearly a quarter of a million workers and more than 100,000 children would benefit from an increase in the state minimum wage. (A Working Poor Families Project report; state-level data on selected demographics of low-wage workers)

Jun 22 2018

The Well-Being of Black Children in New Mexico

2018-11-28T16:00:41-07:00Economic Security Publications, Education Publications, Health Publications, Kids Count Publications, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

This presentation, given at the NM Office of African American Affairs' Black Child Wellness Summit, introduces our Well-Being of Black Children in New Mexico special KIDS COUNT report on how New Mexico's Black children are doing on some 20 indicators of child well-being.

Jun 21 2018

The Well-Being of Black Children in New Mexico

2018-11-28T15:59:38-07:00Economic Security Publications, Education Publications, Health Publications, Kids Count Publications, Local Data, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

Report Child poverty in New Mexico is among the worst in the nation and disparities exist within all indicators of child well-being for children of color. Although our state's Black children are generally faring better than Black children nationally, they still face significant obstacles to success. This report, created in partnership with the NM Office of African American Affairs, looks at how New Mexico's Black children are doing on some 20 indicators of child well-being. (A special KIDS COUNT report; state-, county-, and school-district-level data on indicators of child well-being)

Jul 31 2017

Racial and Ethnic Bias in New Mexico Drug Law Enforcement

2018-06-14T20:59:19-07:00Local Data, Publications, Racial and Ethnic Equity Publications|

For more than four decades, governments have used harsh criminal punishments as the primary tool to address the possession, use, and sales of illegal substances. Complex laws and regulations have been created to penalize drug use and the possession of controlled substances. These drug laws have resulted in disparate impacts for people of color. (Policy brief; data for Bernalillo County on incarceration rates by race and ethnicity)