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Sharon Kayne in NM Voices for Children's Communications Director.
Mar 21 2019

Report: New Mexico Should Invest in Public Infrastructure to Build a Strong Economy

2019-03-21T12:37:11+00:00 Press Releases|

“This report makes it clear that while the Legislature and Governor were wise to invest some of the state’s oil-boom revenue surplus in building our infrastructure, we still have a long way to go,” said James Jimenez, executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children. “New Mexico must find a way to significantly increase stable, sustainable revenues in order to make the long-term infrastructure investments that supports a 21st century economy.”

Mar 14 2019

Child Advocates: Underfunding of U.S. Census Likely to Hurt NM

2019-03-14T10:08:04+00:00 Press Releases|

“The census – which is required by the U.S. Constitution – is foundational to our democracy,” said James Jimenez, executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children. “It’s used to determine voting districts for elections ranging from school boards to the U.S. House of Representatives. And, of course, it determines how much federal funding New Mexico will receive for everything from education to health care to highway maintenance. So we need to ensure that everyone is counted.”

Mar 12 2019

School funding in New Mexico lower than a decade ago

2019-03-14T12:10:09+00:00 Education News Coverage, News Coverage, Tax and Budget News Coverage|

New Mexico is one of many states that have failed to increase per-student funding compared to a decade ago, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP). There are 26 states that have made larger investments in K-12 students since 2008, per-student funding in New Mexico remained at nine percent less in 2016 than in 2008, after considering inflation.

Mar 11 2019

Eye on New Mexico: Improving the lives of children

2019-03-15T12:06:35+00:00 Economic Security News Coverage, Education News Coverage, Health News Coverage, Human Rights/Civic Participation News Coverage, Kids Count News Coverage, News Coverage, Racial and Ethnic Equity News Coverage, Tax and Budget News Coverage|

Hosts Chris Ramirez and Nathan O'Neal discussed what's in store for New Mexico's children. From the 2020 census to the bills working through the Roundhouse right now, there are many impacts on the future generations. Featured on the show are James Jimenez and Amber Wallin with New Mexico Voices for Children.

Mar 08 2019

Report: NM Should Boost Working Families & Build a Stronger Economy by Expanding its Earned Income Tax Credit

2019-03-07T16:50:40+00:00 Press Releases|

Policymakers in Santa Fe should expand New Mexico’s Working Families Tax Credit (WFTC), a state version of the successful federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) that helps working families earning low wages meet basic needs. State EITCs – which are on the books in 29 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico – build on the success of the federal credit by reducing hardship for working families and children, and boosting the nation’s future economic prospects.

Mar 06 2019

Early education is key to breaking cycle of poverty

2019-03-06T16:18:06+00:00 Education News Coverage, News Coverage|

Despite rapid economic growth in 2018, a report from New Mexico Voices for Children found that the number of New Mexico children living in poverty is actually increasing — nearly 1 in 3 kids is being raised at or below the poverty line. Thankfully, there are solutions capable of breaking this cycle and setting New Mexico on a path toward giving every child an equal opportunity to succeed.

Mar 06 2019

Report: School Funding in New Mexico Still Lower than a Decade Ago

2019-03-06T16:13:34+00:00 Press Releases|

New Mexico is one of several states that have failed to increase their total per-student funding compared to a decade ago, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP). While 26 states have made larger investments in their K-12 students since 2008, per-student funding in New Mexico remained 9 percent less in 2016 than in 2008, after adjusting for inflation.