Healthy and Safe Communities 2018-06-24T14:10:32+00:00

Healthy and Safe Communities

Our communities, workforce, and economy cannot be healthy when so many New Mexico children and families lack access to a comprehensive and high-quality system of physical and behavioral health, prevention, and wellness resources. Safe and supportive communities build resilient families and a strong state.

Featured Content

The Well-Being of Black Children in New Mexico

Although our state’s Black children are generally faring better than Black children nationally, they still face significant obstacles to success. This report, created in partnership with the NM Office of African American Affairs, looks at how New Mexico’s Black children are doing on 20 indicators of child well-being. (A special KIDS COUNT report)
 

Moving the Needle on Child Well-Being

New Mexico has a long and proud history of cutting-edge innovation in many fields, so making progress on child well-being is within our reach if we fully commit to it. This report lays out the ways in which we can move the needle on child well-being by enacting smart public policies. (A special KIDS COUNT report)
 

Link the the Kids Count Data CenterNew Mexico Kids at the Crossroads

With the highest rate of child poverty in the nation, New Mexico is not providing the opportunities our children need to succeed. But the good news is that we can improve opportunities for New Mexico’s kids through public policy. This children’s agenda for candidates in the 2018 election provides 30 policy recommendations that will help improve child well-being in New Mexico. (Policy brief)

Recent Publications

New Mexico’s 2018 KIDS COUNT profile

June 27th, 2018|

New Mexico has fallen to 50th in the nation in child well-being after ranking 49th for the past four years. This state profile shows how our children are faring on the 16 indicators of child well-being used in the national KIDS COUNT rankings. (State profile; state-level data on indicators of child well-being)

The Well-Being of Black Children in New Mexico

June 21st, 2018|

Child poverty in New Mexico is among the worst in the nation and disparities exist within all indicators of child well-being for children of color. Although our state's Black children are generally faring better than Black children nationally, they still face significant obstacles to success. This report, created in partnership with the NM Office of African American Affairs, looks at how New Mexico's Black children are doing on some 20 indicators of child well-being. (A special KIDS COUNT report; state-, county-, and school-district-level data on indicators of child well-being)

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Recent Blog Posts

Without sick leave, public’s health at risk

September 21st, 2017|

The Healthy Workforce Ordinance that Albuquerque voters will soon decide will give our businesses an edge in attracting the best workers from cities and states that do not have similar provisions to help their workforce – and their communities – stay healthy. Albuquerque voters should pass it. Read more

Where’s Susana on the Senate health care debate?

September 20th, 2017|

New Mexico’s governor is responsible for expanding Medicaid here, and it’s had significant economic and health benefits for the state. So where is Governor Martinez on this issue? We don’t know because she hasn’t spoken up.

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Recent News Coverage

Keep NM kids in mind when you vote this year

June 30th, 2018|

Officials with New Mexico Voices for Children, which partners on the survey, point to a decline in state funding as the cause for many of these problems. Deputy Director Amber Wallin said the state has passed 37 tax cuts since 2008; has reduced per-pupil funding for schools and money for higher education; and has cut back on the number of school-based health centers.

New Mexico ranks 50th in Kids Count report

June 27th, 2018|

Four factors determine the Kids Count rankings: education, health, economic well-being, and family and community. The non-profit organization NM Voices for Children says changes to the state’s health data played a major role in moving New Mexico from 49th to 50th.

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Current Initiatives

A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a study to determine if a public policy may have unintended consequences on the health of a community or population. Specifically, this HIA, A Health Impact Assessment of a Food Tax in New Mexico, looks at whether reinstating the gross receipts tax on food–essentially raising the cost of groceries–would negatively impact the health of New Mexico’s low-income families and, if so, whether the potential benefits of more revenue for local governments would offset such impacts.