Reports

How can a $1 raise in pay throw families into poverty? When they are at the ceiling for child care assistance eligibility, a tiny raise can mean they go from paying 18 percent of their income on child care to 38 percent. Work supports like child care assistance should help families achieve economic stability. But the sudden loss of benefits--called the cliff effect--can have the opposite effect. (May 2018) Read more
New Mexico has a long and proud history of cutting-edge innovation in many fields, so making progress on child well-being is within our reach if we fully commit to it. This report lays out the ways in which we can move the needle on child well-being by enacting smart public policies.Read more
Updated! Learn the ins and outs of working with your legislators to promote an important policy or cause. (A Fiscal Policy Project publication; Updated March 2018) Read more
New Mexico is at a crossroads. At the federal level we're seeing unpredictability in how child-serving programs are funded and at the state level we're poised to elect a new governor. This annual publication reports the latest data on child well-being in New Mexico to help us choose the path forward. (An annual KIDS COUNT report; Jan. 2018) Read more
Updated! Learn the basics of New Mexico’s tax system—where the state gets its tax revenue to pay for public programs—in this simplified guide. (A Fiscal Policy Project publication; updated Sept. 2017) Read more
Learn the basics of the state’s general fund budget—what the state spends money on and how much goes where—in this companion to Advocate’s Guide to the New Mexico State Budget. (A Fiscal Policy Project publication; updated Mar. 2017) Read more
New Mexico has long ranked at the bottom of the 50 states on overall child well-being. However, in some of the 16 indicators of child well-being, it would take just a small change to move our state up in the rankings. This series of fact sheets looks at what it would take to move the needle on each indicator (A KIDS COUNT special report; Jan. 2017; pdf) Read more
In New Mexico, the Working Families Tax Credit is one of the most sensible parts of our tax code: it encourages work, helps to raise hard-working families out of poverty, and benefits almost 300,000 children, while also pumping millions back into local communities. Increasing the credit is a smart investment in our businesses, working families, and future. (A Working Poor Families Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
In the past year, New Mexico has seen some improvements in child well-being—especially regarding health. We’ve also seen troubling increases in other indicators over the short- and long-term. This annual KIDS COUNT report on child well-being presents data by county, tribal area, and school district on indicators such as child and teen death rates, preschool enrollment, teen births, and more. (An annual KIDS COUNT report; Jan. 2017) Read more
Raising the minimum wage is an effective strategy for reducing poverty in New Mexico, particularly given the erosion of its purchasing power since it was last raised in 2009. This report looks at the demographics of the state’s minimum wage earners, as well as makes the case for indexing the wage to inflation. (A Fiscal Policy Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
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