Economic Security and Prosperity

This fact sheet for The Cliff Effect: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back sums up the report's basic message about how the sudden loss of benefits like child care assistance--called the cliff effect--can act as a disincentive for hard-working families trying to lift themselves out of poverty. Also includes policy recommendations for mitigating the cliff effect. (Fact sheet; May 2018)
How can a $1 raise in pay throw families into poverty? When they are at the ceiling for child care assistance eligibility, a tiny raise can mean they go from paying 18 percent of their income on child care to 38 percent. Work supports like child care assistance should help families achieve economic stability. But the sudden loss of benefits--called the cliff effect--can have the opposite effect. (May 2018) Read more
New Mexico has a long and proud history of cutting-edge innovation in many fields, so making progress on child well-being is within our reach if we fully commit to it. This report lays out the ways in which we can move the needle on child well-being by enacting smart public policies.Read more
New Mexico's Working Families Tax Credit works with the federal Earned Income Tax Credit, which has been hailed as one of the best anti-poverty, pro-job creation measures Congress has ever enacted. This fact sheet explains why this tax credit works so well and how New Mexico policymakers could make it even more effective. And it could all be paid for by ending an ineffective tax credit. (April 2018)
New Mexico has had one of the slowest job growth rates in the nation. But one industry is leading the way with new hires--and we have the Affordable Care Act, and specifically the Medicaid expansion, to thank for much of that. This fact sheet illustrates how health care jobs are good for the whole state. (Feb. 2018) Read more
Prosperity requires investments. You can’t grow a garden without good soil, water, and some hard work. Same with a state—you can’t have prosperity without resources, infrastructure, and a skilled workforce. But New Mexico has tried to cut its way to prosperity and it hasn't worked. This brief offers several recommendations for raising revenue so lawmakers can invest in our state and its people. (Policy brief; Jan. 2018) Read more
Created for a workshop presented at the Community Pantry in Gallup, this PowerPoint presentations looks at the negative impacts of taxing both food and nonprofits, and includes information about how to advocate with legislators on behalf of low-income and food-insecure New Mexicans and the nonprofits that serve them. (Dec. 2017) Read more
This PowerPoint, presented to the Legislative Health & Human Services Committee, goes over KIDS COUNT data on child well-being and covers several policy recommendations that would help improve child well-being by helping improve family economic security. (Oct. 2017) Read more
Career pathways, programs that move non-traditional adult students along a continuum into post-secondary education, have shown real promise in other states. However, they require a systemic framework that aligns policies and funding for a comprehensive approach. This PowerPoint, presented to the SUN PATH Advisory Council, looks at funding sources, possible frameworks, and examples of effective career pathway programs in other states. (Sept. 2017) Read more
New Mexico's employment ratio--the percentage of the working-age population to the number of employed people--is the lowest it's been since 1976. It's also lower than neighboring states and the national average. (Infographic; Mar. 2017) Read more
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