Reports

Learn the basics of the state’s general fund budget—what the state spends money on and how much goes where—in this companion to Advocate’s Guide to the New Mexico State Budget. (A Fiscal Policy Project publication; updated Mar. 2017) Read more
New Mexico has long ranked at the bottom of the 50 states on overall child well-being. However, in some of the 16 indicators of child well-being, it would take just a small change to move our state up in the rankings. This series of fact sheets looks at what it would take to move the needle on each indicator (A KIDS COUNT special report; Jan. 2017; pdf) Read more
In New Mexico, the Working Families Tax Credit is one of the most sensible parts of our tax code: it encourages work, helps to raise hard-working families out of poverty, and benefits almost 300,000 children, while also pumping millions back into local communities. Increasing the credit is a smart investment in our businesses, working families, and future. (A Working Poor Families Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
In the past year, New Mexico has seen some improvements in child well-being—especially regarding health. We’ve also seen troubling increases in other indicators over the short- and long-term. This annual KIDS COUNT report on child well-being presents data by county, tribal area, and school district on indicators such as child and teen death rates, preschool enrollment, teen births, and more. (An annual KIDS COUNT report; Jan. 2017) Read more
Raising the minimum wage is an effective strategy for reducing poverty in New Mexico, particularly given the erosion of its purchasing power since it was last raised in 2009. This report looks at the demographics of the state’s minimum wage earners, as well as makes the case for indexing the wage to inflation. (A Fiscal Policy Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
The TANF program provides some cash assistance to eligible families with children so they can better afford basic necessities. Unfortunately, TANF in New Mexico does not sufficiently address one of the reasons families fall into or remain in poverty: the lack of education credentials and job skills, which present barriers to employment and to getting jobs that pay family-sustaining wages. (A KIDS COUNT Special Report; Dec. 2016) Read more
A lawsuit currently working its way thought the New Mexico court system asserts that the state has failed to provide school funding sufficient for the education of all school-age children in the state, as required by the New Mexico constitution. This report supports those arguments. (A Fiscal Policy Project report; Aug. 2016) Read more
For the third straight year, New Mexico ranks 49th in the nation for child well-being. It will take a comprehensive and focused set of strategies, and the political and public will to make them a reality, to improve child well-being in New Mexico. This policy agenda, based on the metrics used to measure child well-being in the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s annual KIDS COUNT Data Book, offers one such approach. (Policy agenda; updated June 2016) Read more
Many low-wage occupations do not come with benefits like paid sick leave. So workers who are already earning low wages have to forfeit those wages in order to stay at home to tend a sick child or care for themselves. The U.S. has no national policy, so states and cities are taking up the issue. With the lowest rate in the nation of workers with paid sick leave, New Mexico has much to gain by enacting such legislation. (A Working Poor Families Project report; Feb. 2016) Read more
While child poverty is down slightly, New Mexico now leads the nation with the highest rate of child poverty. This annual KIDS COUNT report on child well-being presents data by county, tribal area, and school district on indicators such as the rates of health care coverage among children, preschool enrollment, child abuse, and teen births. It also tracks trends on some of these important indicators and looks at disparities across racial and ethnic lines. (An annual KIDS COUNT report; Jan. 2016) Read more
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