Tax Fairness and Budget Adequacy

Some lawmakers have balked at fully funding Medicaid now that we have to start paying our share of the Medicaid expansion, but there are many reasons to do it. The Medicaid expansion has been good for our economy. By increasing demand for health care, Medicaid has created some of the only job growth the state has seen over the last year. And job growth will likely remain strong in the years ahead. (Fact sheet; Feb. 2016) Read more
Some lawmakers have balked at fully funding Medicaid now that we have to start paying our share of the Medicaid expansion, but there are many reasons to do it. Actually, there more than 800,000 reasons to fully fund Medicaid—because that’s how many New Mexicans are able to receive health care thanks to the program. (Fact sheet; Feb. 2016) Read more
Some lawmakers have balked at fully funding Medicaid now that we have to start paying our share of the Medicaid expansion, but there are many reasons to do it. Besides decreasing hospital stays for those who are uninsured, the Medicaid expansion is good for the state piggy bank in other ways, because federal funding is now covering medical bills the state used to pay. We’re also bringing in new revenue. In all, the expansion will more than pay for itself until 2021. (Fact sheet; Feb. 2016) Read more
Some lawmakers have balked at fully funding Medicaid now that we have to start paying our share of the Medicaid expansion, but there are many reasons to do it. For one, the number of hospital stays that are not covered by insurance has dropped, while the number that are covered by Medicaid has risen by the same amount. That saves New Mexico money. (Fact sheet; Feb. 2016) Read more
Could something as seemingly small as a tax on groceries be detrimental to the health of some New Mexicans? This health impact assessment shows that taxing food―as some lawmakers at both the local and state levels are considering—could do harm to families who already struggle to put enough food on their table. (Report; Nov. 2015) Read more
The Gila River diversion is not only bad for the environment, it’s a terrible way to invest what could end up being as much as $1 billion of taxpayer money. There are better ways to meet our state’s water needs and much more important investments to make with those public funds. (Policy brief; Oct. 2015) Read more
New Mexico’s Working Families Tax Credit not only lifts tens of thousands of low-income families out of poverty each year, it also generates economic activity because the money is spent quickly and locally. Increasing the value of the credit would help with New Mexico’s sluggish recovery and cost the state much less than recently enacted tax cuts to profitable corporations. (Legislative brief; Feb. 2015) Read more
Created for the 2015 legislative session, this fact sheet looks at who benefits from the state's Working Families Tax Credit and why it should be increased. (Feb. 2015) Read more
The corporate income tax cuts enacted in 2013 are costing the state more than anticipated and doing little--if anything--for job growth. This fact sheet makes the case for why lawmakers should stop enacting ineffective tax cuts. (Feb. 2015) Read more
The state's Children, Youth and Families Department seems to have its spending priorities a bit mixed up, as this fact sheet shows. While the department is requesting $10 million more for investigating allegations of child abuse, it's asked for less money--not to mention having neglected to spend federal money--for child care assistance even though the lack of affordable child care is a risk factor for child abuse. (Fact sheet; Jan. 2015) Read more
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