Economic Security and Prosperity

New Mexico's employment ratio--the percentage of the working-age population to the number of employed people--is the lowest it's been since 1976. It's also lower than neighboring states and the national average. (Infographic; Mar. 2017) Read more
The Earned Income Tax Credit has long been called the "best anti-poverty" measure to come out of Congress. New Mexico's state version, the Working Families Tax Credit, is also a powerful poverty-fighting. But legislators could make it better. (A Working Poor Families Project fact sheet; Feb. 2017) Read more
Myths abound when it comes to who earns the minimum wage. It's not teenagers looking for pocket change anymore. More and more minimum wage earners are older, have some education, and even have families. This one-pager looks at some of the most surprising facts about minimum wage earners. (A Fiscal Policy Project publication; Jan. 2017) Read more
In New Mexico, the Working Families Tax Credit is one of the most sensible parts of our tax code: it encourages work, helps to raise hard-working families out of poverty, and benefits almost 300,000 children, while also pumping millions back into local communities. Increasing the credit is a smart investment in our businesses, working families, and future. (A Working Poor Families Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
Raising the minimum wage is an effective strategy for reducing poverty in New Mexico, particularly given the erosion of its purchasing power since it was last raised in 2009. This report looks at the demographics of the state’s minimum wage earners, as well as makes the case for indexing the wage to inflation. (A Fiscal Policy Project report; Jan. 2017) Read more
Reinstatement on the tax on food is likely to come up in the 2017 legislative session even though New Mexico has the second highest rate of children who don't always have enough to eat. These three infographics look at food insecurity in New Mexico and which other states in the nation tax food. (Infographics; Dec. 2016) Read more
The TANF program provides some cash assistance to eligible families with children so they can better afford basic necessities. Unfortunately, TANF in New Mexico does not sufficiently address one of the reasons families fall into or remain in poverty: the lack of education credentials and job skills, which present barriers to employment and to getting jobs that pay family-sustaining wages. (A KIDS COUNT Special Report; Dec. 2016) Read more
A PowerPoint presentation on the status of child well-being in New Mexico, with a focus on child abuse, looking at policies that have negatively impacted child well-being and policy solutions that would improve it. Presented to the Legislative Health and Human Services Committee. (Sept. 2016) Read more
A PowerPoint presentation that looks are some of the reasons child hunger is so pervasive in New Mexico as well as policy solutions from our NM KIDS are COUNTing on Us campaign that would help. Presented at the Interfaith Hunger Coalition's Hunger 101 Workshop in Albuquerque. (Sept. 2016) Read more
A PowerPoint presentation looking at how Black children fare in New Mexico. Includes findings from the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Race for Results report, which shows that New Mexico's Black children fare better than Black kids across the nation in many indicators. (Aug. 2016) Read more
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